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Billy Currington

Billy Currington
Billy Currington’s latest album bears the breezy title Summer Forever, but the talented Georgia native has spent more than a decade in the spotlight proving he’s truly a man for all seasons. Possessing one of the smoothest and most distinct voices in any genre of music, Currington is equally skilled at delivering upbeat summertime anthems as well as exploring the complexities of life and love with a poignant ballad. On Summer Forever, Currington’s sixth studio album, he brings both with a collection of songs that will take the listener on a riveting musical journey and leave them breathless at the end of the ride.

Since his self-titled debut album bowed on Mercury Records in 2003, Currington has scored eleven career No. 1 singles, most recently, “Don’t Hurt Like It Used To.” His other hits that reached the No. 1 spot include such memorable songs as “Good Directions,” “Let Me Down Easy,” “Must Be Doin’ Somethin’ Right,” “People Are Crazy,” “That’s How Country Boys Roll,” “Hey Girl,” and “We Are Tonight.” Over the years, the self-effacing Georgia boy has amassed an impressive list of accolades. He won the “Hottest Video of the Year” honor at the fan-voted CMT Music Awards for “Must Be Doin’ Somethin’ Right” in 2006. The same year, he received an ACM nod for Top New Male Vocalist. His hit duet with Shania Twain, “Party for Two,” earned nominations from both the CMA and ACM. “People Are Crazy” took Currington’s already hot career to another level. He earned Grammy nominations for Male Country Vocal Performance and Best Country Song in addition to being nominate for Single and Song of the Year from the Country Music Association.

Currington has come a long way from his rural Georgia roots. He spent his early years on Tybee Island before his family moved inland to Rincon. He grew up listening to vinyl records by Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings and Kenny Rogers, and when his mom took him to one of Rogers’ concerts, 10-year-old Billy knew immediately he wanted to someday be the one on stage performing. However, he wasn’t sure how he was going to get there. “To be honest, I never even heard of Nashville till I was 17 or 18,” he says. All that changed when Currington’s pastor recognized his talent while he was singing in church, and decided to give the youngster some career guidance. “He had been living in Nashville at one point,” Currington recalls. “He said, ‘Man, there’s a town called Nashville that you can get a record deal. Your dreams could come true. I’m going to take you there.’ So he took me and showed me the town. He introduced me to people. When I got back home, I totally made up my mind that when I graduated high school I was going to go back.”

And so he did. He made the move to Music City at 18 and began paying his dues by pouring concrete and working as a personal trainer at a gym during the day. At night, he was getting a musical education playing in bars all over Nashville. Naturally, he began meeting other aspiring songwriters and artists. He began writing songs and his warm, strong voice made him one of the town’s most in demand demo singers. “I was doing 10 demos a day,” he says. “Before you know it, I started getting deal offers from record labels.”

He signed with Mercury in 2003, and immediately garnered attention with his debut single, “Walk a Little Straighter,” an autobiographical song about life with his alcoholic stepfather. The song peaked at No. 8, an auspicious debut for a newcomer. He proved the quick success was no fluke when he followed with “I Got A Feelin,” which became his first top five hit. From there, the hits continued as his sophomore album Doin’ Somethin’ Right spawned his first No. 1 with “Must Be Doin’ Somethin’ Right” and his second No. 1 with “Good Directions.” Released in 2008, his third album, Little Bit of Everything, featured five songs co-written by Currington. The Bobby Braddock/Troy Jones penned “People Are Crazy” became his third No. 1 and he followed that with a song he co-wrote, “That’s How Country Boys Roll,” which also hit the top of the charts. In September 2010, Currington released Enjoy Yourself, which included No. 1 hits “Pretty Good at Drinkin’ Beer” and “Let Me Down Easy.” His fifth album, We Are Tonight, further fueled him momentum spawning two No. 1 singles – “Hey Girl” and the title track.

Though Currington has grown in knowledge and confidence, his goals in making Summer Forever is the same as when he recorded his debut. “Music is a snapshot of people’s lives and most of all, I want to leave people in a happy place,” he says with a smile. “Whether they’re sitting on a beach listening to this album or they’re walking around their house or cleaning their house or whatever. Wherever they’re at listening to this album, I want to leave them with a happy and peaceful feeling.”

Little Big Town

Little Big Town
GRAMMY, ACM, CMA, and AMA Award-winning group, Little Big Town -- consisting of members Karen Fairchild, Phillip Sweet, Kimberly Schlapman, and Jimi Westbrook -- first entered the music scene over 19 years ago with hit songs “Boondocks,” “Bring It On Home,” “Good As Gone” and the GRAMMY-nominated “Little White Church.” Their breakthrough albums Tornado and Pain Killer produced multiple #1 singles, including “Pontoon,” “Tornado,” and “Day Drinking,” as well as the history-making, best-selling country single of the year (2015) “Girl Crush.” Released February 24, 2017, Little Big Town's latest studio album, The Breaker, debuted #1 on the Billboard Country Charts and Top 10 (No.4) on the Billboard 200 to critical acclaim, marking the group’s fourth Top 10 debut on the Billboard 200 chart. The album features their GRAMMY-winning, multi-week #1 single, “Better Man,” as well as “When Someone Stops Loving You.”

Little Big Town has earned more than 40 award show nominations and in the past five years has taken home nearly 20 awards, including multiple GRAMMY, AMA, People’s Choice, CMA, ACM awards, and an Emmy award. Currently the reigning CMA and ACM Vocal Group of the Year, the Country Music Hall of Fame inductees (2014) went onto receive their star on the Nashville Walk of Fame in 2017. Also in 2017, Little Big Town hosted a sold-out, year-long artist residency at the famed Ryman Auditorium in Nashville -- marking the venue’s first-ever, year-long residency in its 125-year history. The band also recently launched 4 Cellars wine, their first non-musical project as a band, with Browne Family Vineyards. For more information on Little Big Town visit LittleBigTown.com or follow them @littlebigtown.

Old Dominion

Old Dominion
2018 ACM and CMA Vocal Group of the Year winner, Old Dominion, has emerged as one of the hottest breaking bands in country music, fusing clever lyrics and an infectious sound. Proving that they are not your average country band, Old Dominion blends old-fashioned country charm, lyrical wit and rock n' roll grit into radio-friendly, hook-heavy pop nuggets. Old Dominion’s sophomore album, Happy Endings, debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard Country Albums chart and No. 7 on the Billboard Top 200. Their latest single, “Make It Sweet,” follows the success of previous singles “No Such Thing As A Broken Heart,” “Written in the Sand” and “Hotel Key,” all of which hit No. 1 on Billboard Country Airplay and Mediabase charts. To top it off, each and every single OD has released has been certified Platinum by the RIAA. In 2016, the band was notably named ACM New Group of the Year, ACCA Breakthrough Group of the Year, AIMP Songwriter Artist of the Year and Music Row Breakthrough Artist of the Year. Old Dominion consists of lead singer Matthew Ramsey, lead guitarist Brad Tursi, multi-instrumentalist Trevor Rosen, bassist Geoff Sprung and drummer Whit Sellers.

Lee Brice

Lee Brice
When Lee Brice isn't selling out arenas, writing and recording songs, or building a new brand like American Born whiskey — you'll find him with his wife Sara, two young boys Takoda (10) and Ryker (4), and new daughter Trulee Nanette, who was born on June 2, 2017.

With more than 12 million in RIAA certified sales, Lee has achieved Gold and Platinum on every album and single released, with “A Woman Like You” reaching Double Platinum status.

Gold album certifications include: Love Like Crazy, Hard2Love and I Don't Dance. Single certifications include “I Don't Dance” and “A Woman Like You,” with “That Don’t Sound Like You” reaching double Platinum.

With well over 2 billion spins on Pandora, Lee Brice was inducted into the streaming service’s ‘Billionaires Club’ on June 8, 2018.

The “Rumor” singer, who is now among the Top 25 most-streamed country artists of all time on Pandora, is only the second country artist behind Keith Urban to receive the Pandora Billionaire plaque and puts Lee in company with not only Urban, but legends including Johnny Cash and Fleetwood Mac, and pop phenoms such as John Legend.

Lee is a GRAMMY nominee, a CMA nominee and a double ACM award winner, and he's taken five radio singles to #1: “A Woman Like You," “Hard To Love," “I Drive Your Truck," “I Don’t Dance," and “Drinking Class.” Garth Brooks, Jason Aldean, Kenny Chesney and others have recorded his songs and he's performed on TV shows including NBC's Today, ABC's The Bachelor, NBC's The Voice and FOX's Miss USA 2018 (May 21).

Lee’s new single “Rumor” is out now and follows “Boy,” the debut song from his fourth studio album, Lee Brice(November 3, 2017). Follow Lee Brice here: Official Website: leebrice.com Facebook: facebook.com/leebricemusic Twitter: twitter.com/leebrice Instagram: instagram.com/leebrice YouTube: youtube.com/user/leebricemusic

Brothers Osborne

Brothers Osborne
Brothers Osborne had just wrapped up another tour when the band's bus pulled into Port St. Joe — a sleepy beach town in the Florida Panhandle, tucked against the Gulf of Mexico — in April 2017. The guys had been on the road for nearly two years. Along the way, they'd transformed themselves from country newcomers into genuine stars, releasing four Top 40 singles (all taken from the duo's gold-selling debut, Pawn Shop) while racking up nearly a dozen CMA Awards, Grammy nominations, and ACM trophies.

It was time to record a new album — one that doubled down on the Osbornes' guitar-driven twang, while also showing off their growth as a live act. Jay Joyce, the band's producer, had suggested they use his Florida beach house as a recording location, providing a place free of outside distractions. That's how TJ and John found themselves in Port St. Joe, brushing sand from the tops of their beer cans and recording a new batch of songs — all of them co-written by Brothers Osborne — in Joyce's oceanside home. The process felt raw, honest, and uniquely homemade. It was different from the big-budget studio experience in Nashville, which suited the Osbornes just fine.

"It wasn’t a real studio," says John, who grew up alongside his younger brother in the similarly- sized waterfront town of Deale, Maryland. "It was a house. The place was in no way built for recording, which made it even cooler. We set up most of our equipment in the living room. The guitar amps were put in the master bathroom. The drums were set up near the fireplace." Joined by longtime members of their touring band, TJ and John spent two weeks in that living room, recording the 10 songs that make up their second album, Port Saint Joe. With waves crashing onto the Florida shoreline outside, they captured most of the album in a series of live takes. Listen closely and you can still make out the sounds of roaring water, wind, and even a few banging pots from the nearby kitchen, where Joyce's brother whipped up daily meals for the crew.

It's fitting that Brothers Osborne chose an unconventional location for the Port Saint Joe sessions. After all, TJ and John's songs have always bent the traditional rules of country music, sticking closely to a sound that bridges the gap between the mainstream and the alternative world. It's there — in the grey areas between genres — that Brothers Osborne continue to pack the biggest punch.

Case in point: "Shoot Me Straight," Port Saint Joe's kickoff single. Clocking in at six minutes, the song fires twin barrels of groove-heavy funk and swampy southern rock, with TJ's baritone vocals and John's fiery fretwork leading the charge. In some ways, it's a close cousin to Pawn Shop's biggest hit, "Stay a Little Longer." Both songs end with John's extended guitar solos, which make them unlikely choices for radio singles. And yet both songs have become Top 40 hits for the band, pointing to a diverse audience whose members were raised, like the Osbornes themselves, on a mix of blue-collar rock and classic country.

"That song is literally just us jamming in a room," John says of "Shoot Me Straight." "One of the last nights we were at Jay's beach house, we had some friends all come down from Nashville. We had all been drinking and partying a little bit, and Jay wanted us to get in front of our friends and jam. That live performance was the take we kept. He wouldn’t let us fix anything. I'm glad that he didn't, because music can be so perfect these days. You can go back into the studio and fix anything you want, but this record isn't like that. It's a snapshot of what actually happened."

The diversity continues throughout the album's tracklist. There are country waltzes, half-lit drinking songs, power ballads, southern slow jams, and rootsy rave-ups, all captured by Joyce — the band's Grammy-winning producer, known for his work on Eric Church's Mr. Misunderstood, Carrie Underwood's Storyteller, and Little Big Town's The Breaker — and written by the Osbornes. TJ and John teamed up with a number of co-writers, too. They penned "Weed, Whiskey and Willie" with Laura Veltz. "That song is a lot like who we are as people — just a little bit darker and a little bit sadder than most country artists," John explains. And finished "Pushing Up Daisies" with Kendell Marvell - "It's about the kind of love that will last past our own lives," says TJ, and wrote "Me Before You" with Shane McAnally. Bookending the album are two standout songs about enjoying the current moment: "Slow Your Roll," a laidback order to chill out and drink up, and "While You Still Can," a reminder to the make the most of your everyday interactions with loved ones.

The result is an album that's both familiar and fresh, mixing countrified trends — the low, deep- seated twang of TJ's voice; the rustic sound of mandolins and acoustic guitars; the story-based songwriting — with amplified guitars and pop hooks. It's a country album for the modern age: forward-thinking and versatile, with songs that nod to the past while still pushing forward into new territory. If Pawn Shop introduced Brothers Osborne, then Port St. Joe defines them clearly.

"In making this record, we were very confident in who we are and what we are," TJ says. And what are they? At their core, Brothers Osborne are a unique kind of country duo — one that is rooted in TJ's voice and John's incendiary guitar playing. Most duos are built upon singing, but Brothers Osborne aren't like most duos. And Port Saint Joe, with its unique recording process and tracklist, isn't like most albums.

"Pawn Shop was a collection of songs, sounds, and inspirations from when we were kids," John adds. "Port Saint Joe is a reflection of how far we’ve come since Pawn Shop — not only as people, but as songwriters, performers, singers, and players. We’ve played so many shows collectively as a band. We’ve grown together as a unit. This is a reflection of the amount of work that we’ve put in since Pawn Shop. It's certainly a natural progression for us."

Eli Young Band

Eli Young Band
The ELI YOUNG BAND has always been unique in modern Country music – a true band of brothers who play their own instruments, write their own songs and cling fast to their Texas roots. They’d even go so far as to call themselves “misfits,” but with their fourth major label album, FINGERPRINTS (The Valory Music Co.), they’re finally embracing what makes them different once and for all.

“With 17 years of experience comes a little bit of wisdom and freedom in knowing who you are,” says lead singer Mike Eli. “And what you’re really good at.”

Although their sound has evolved over time, what they’re good at has always been the same – organic, live- show focused Country dripping with authenticity and perfected in clubs, amphitheaters and stadiums from coast to coast.

Eli founded the band with guitarist James Young, bassist Jon Jones and drummer Chris Thompson at the University of North Texas in 2000, building a grass-roots fanbase that propelled each of their previous three albums into the Top 5 of Billboard’s Country Albums chart, with 2014’s 10,000 TOWNS bowing at No. 1.

Three No. 1 singles gave the band an edgy, romantically-charged identity (“Crazy Girl,” “Even If It Breaks Your Heart” and “Drunk Last Night”). Their stable of hits collected Platinum and Multi-Platinum certifications that lead to Grammy and CMA Award nominations, Billboard Awards and an ACM trophy for Song of the Year (“Crazy Girl”). All of these accolades combined with their loyal fanbase and successful touring have resulted in over 500 million streams of their career catalogue.

Confident in their soulful, hearts-on-fire brand of Country, the group headed back into the studio to co-produce FINGERPRINTS alongside Ross Copperman and Jeremy Stover. Eight of the 11 new tracks were penned by the band members themselves. They’ve returned to a live-show-first mentality, trading in studio tricks for the “meat and potatoes” of a touring band; ringing guitars, driving bass lines, thundering drums and heartfelt, genuine vocals.

“There were so many organic sounds on those first records, and you can hear a lot of that in this album,” says Eli. “But mostly, I think it’s about passion and soul and believe-ability.”

Co-writing with some of Nashville’s hottest hit makers like Ashley Gorley, Lori McKenna, Ryan Hurd and Shane McAnally, that honesty is paired top-notch song craft and vivid imagery.

The album’s FINGERPRINTS title comes from a fist-pumping anthem about a smooth romantic criminal, but its meaning invokes the band’s quest to unmask themselves. No two fingerprints are the same, and their newest collection represents the most personal music they’ve ever made.

“So many of the songs we were writing and connecting with felt personal,” Eli continues. “So many songs came from a place of passion, and something I just really wanted to say.”

New single “Skin & Bones” is a prime example. A tender, epic love song built on real-life devotion and decorated with a dash of Tejano flair, it’s a direct reflection of Eli’s enduring love for his wife, Kacey.

“Walking into the writing room with Phil Barton and Lori McKenna was such a treat,” he explains. “I felt in my gut we were gonna walk out of that room with a special song, and it turns out we did. My wife and I have been together for a lot of years now, and there comes a point where so much of who you are is intertwined and connected. You sometimes lose that line of where they end and you begin.”

Meanwhile, the band was keenly aware of longtime fans’ thirst for “old school” EYB, and their calls on social media led to one of the project’s most nostalgic and heartwarming standouts, “Old Songs.” A feel-good anthem about days – and tunes – gone by, the song celebrates happy memories in a way that harkens back to their first Gold single, “Always the Love Songs.” “When somebody says, ‘We love the old stuff,’ so much of that is built around the memories that come along with the old songs,” Eli says. “When you hear one, they come back right away.”

Backed by harmonica and perfect for a campfire sing along, Carolyn Dawn Johnson provides gorgeous backup vocals on the track, as she does on another laid-back, life-is-good ballad – “God Love the Rain.” But the band was also excited to revisit its rocking side.

“I think we pushed ourselves to dial it up a notch,” Young says, flashing a playful grin. “Maybe that’s why a lot of this reminds us of our earlier days.”

Songs like “Drive,” “Once” and “The Days I Feel Alone” will energize established fans and newcomers alike, while the clever “Never Land” offers a soaring fairy-tale head fake.

An irresistible groove defines “Never Again,” and even songs the band did not write – of which there are only three – feel incredibly true to them ... just like some of their biggest hits. “Heart Needs a Break” is so catchy it can’t be ignored.

“The first time you hear it, you’re singing along,” says Eli. “We were lucky with ‘Never Again,’ ‘Heart Needs a Break’ and ‘Saltwater Gospel.’ We knew right away that we needed to record those, and songs like that seem to end up like ‘Crazy Girl.’ They’re undeniable.”

What’s also undeniable is the band’s unique connection with fans. Even through sonic evolutions and changes to the Country industry, their obsessive following has continued to grow as “Saltwater Gospel” became one of the best reactions from Highway listeners all year on SiriusXM. And that they put on one of the best loved live- shows around – the very fingerprint of the Eli Young Band itself.

Maybe that makes them misfits, but so be it. This is who they are – some of the last true brothers of the road.

“We’ve been through everything together,” Eli says. “We’ve had this inner support system even before we had families of our own, and I think we still turn to that. Whatever the road is in front of us, our friendship will always be the priority.”

This summer, the road will take them from California to Maine, headlining shows with a set of brand new – but classic sounding – Eli Young Band tunes. And it will likely be just as much fun for them as it is for fans.

“We still look at each other as college buddies – not business partners,” says Young. “We get to share our lives with each other and we’ve done some really cool stuff, and our music has been the greatest byproduct of that.”

Lauren Alaina

Lauren Alaina
Georgia native Lauren Alaina captured America’s hearts when she competed on Season 10 of American Idol. In 2017, Lauren followed up her No. 1 debuting first album, Wildflower, with the release of the critically-acclaimed Road Less Traveled. The album landed on multiple end-of-year “Best Of” lists including Billboard, Rolling Stone and Amazon, and it became the top-streamed female country album release of the year. Praised as “full of life lessons and uplift” (PEOPLE), the collection of 12 songs all written by the young star includes Lauren’s first No. 1 hit, title track “Road Less Traveled."

The “sassy Southerner with killer pipes” (PARADE) has shared the stage with superstars including Alan Jackson, Carrie Underwood, Luke Bryan and Martina McBride. Lauren recently joined Cole Swindell on the Reason to Drink Tour and is currently on tour with Jason Aldean for this summer’s High Noon Neon Tour.

Lauren is this year’s ACM New Female Vocalist of the Year and performed on the Apr. 15 broadcast live from Las Vegas. She was also nominated for ACM Vocal Event of the Year for “What Ifs,” the double-platinum-selling No. 1 collaboration with her childhood friend, Kane Brown. Lauren is one of CMT’s Next Women of Country and she received her first CMT Music Award for Breakthrough Video of the Year with her No. 1 smash “Road Less Traveled,” This year she received her second CMT Music Award for Collaborative Video of the Year, with Kane Brown. In addition to performing on the 51st Annual CMA Awards, 2017 saw Lauren earning nominations for CMA New Artist of the Year, several Teen Choice Awards and Radio Disney Music Awards.

LANCO

LANCO
Multi-PLATINUM band LANCO is "at the top of their game" (Pitchfork) as they continue to reveal the story behind their record-breaking debut album HALLELUJAH NIGHTS. Its 2X PLATINUM multi-week No. One hit "Greatest Love Story” paved the course for acclaim with lead singer Brandon Lancaster becoming the first artist in 10 years to have a No. One on the chart solely written by that artist. LANCO also serves as the first Country group in a decade to appear at the top of the Billboard Country albums chart with a debut album, which now boasts over 423 million streams. Earning nominations this year from the ACM, CMT, CMA and American Music Awards, proves why they are the only Country band to achieve a PLATINUM single prior to a debut album release. The “arena-rock leaning band” (Entertainment Weekly) has rapidly created a loyal fanbase over the past five years with more than 400 shows as the featured act with sold-out club runs in major markets such as New York City, Chicago and Los Angeles. The band will close out 2018 with their first-ever headlining run, the HALLELUJAH NIGHTS TOUR, launching in Columbia, MO at The Blue Note on Oct. 24th with Travis Denning. For more information and upcoming tour dates, visit .

Chris Lane

Chris Lane
True artists don’t just arrive on the scene fully formed, they have to find themselves. Even with a few hits in the bag, the search takes time, and it might be a few laps around the sun before things get dialed in – but when that happens it’s like a switch is flipped.

Heading into his second album for Big Loud Records, aptly titled Laps Around the Sun, that quest for self discovery was heavy on Chris Lane’s mind. Two whirlwind years of chart toppers and jam-packed shows had gone by for the breakout country talent, but the North Carolina native still felt restless. He found himself looking back to his early days, and back to the reasons he fell in love with music in the first place.

“I had a moment where I played a show with Kenny Chesney,” the lifelong country fan explains. “It was a festival right on the beach, and I watched him do his thing and I watched the crowd, and there was just something special about that night. I hadn’t seen him in a long time, and the way people connected to what he was doing … I had one of those moments like ‘Man, I really want my music to do that.’”

With Girl Problems, the 2016 album that launched Lane as one of Nashville’s most exciting new artists, the singer-songwriter got a taste of that connection. Its red hot romantic edge led to back-to- back, Gold-certified singles (“Fix” and “For Her”) and the first Country Radio #1 of his career, propelling the set to a Top 10 debut and sending Lane on tour with superstars like Florida Georgia Line, Tim McGraw and Faith Hill – all while helping him rack up 400 million digital streams worldwide, network TV appearances, and more.

But with Laps Around the Sun, this rising star had a bigger, bolder picture in mind, aiming for tunes “everybody can love, and everybody can feel.”

“There’s a certain vibe to this album,” Lane says, describing the serene confidence behind his new brand of modern country. Romance is still a big part of the equation, but now his stories dig deeper – somehow feeling both personal and universal at the same time. And instead of being lit by streetlights and neon, each song basks in the golden rays of a summer afternoon. “It’s a change for me this time around,” Lane says. “But this is what I truly love.”

Produced once again by studio ace Joey Moi (FGL), Laps Around the Sun feels more organic, building off the sandy arrangements of artists like Chesney and Billy Currington with an added touch of new- school cool. Lane and Moi recorded with a live band for the first time, fleshed out melodies on guitars rather than computer screens, and eased Lane’s vocal into its timeless natural register.

Fourteen tracks written by hitmakers like Rhett Akins, Ashley Gorley, Hillary Lindsey and The Warren Brothers made the cut – and in an important lesson learned while Lane put his “laps” in on tour, they were all chosen based on meaning and personal connection, not purely on energy or feel. The album’s first single, “Take Back Home Girl” (featuring Tori Kelly) marks Lane’s coming of age. It builds on the sultry swagger of Girl Problems, but he and the Grammy-nominee aren’t singing about a steamy downtown hookup. Instead, the track reveals who Lane really is – a true country boy with deeply rooted family values – becoming Lane’s third Gold-certified single in a row.

The patient “I Don’t Know About You” charts a similar course – a hard-crushing, swollen-hearts anthem sure to inspire stadium wide sing alongs – while “Number One” takes a soulful look at regret, and “Without You” adds Danielle Bradbery for some sun-kissed romantic harmony.

On “Drunk People,” Lane’s good-natured sense of humor shines bright. The grinning mid-tempo is just smooth enough to not aggravate a hangover headache, but edgy enough to admit that drunk people do dumb things … like get back together. “That song is me to a ‘T,’” Lane says with a laugh. “Every time I have one to many tequila drinks, I think I’ve gotta FaceTime every girlfriend I’ve ever had.”

He throws some sunny shade on “New Phone, Who’s This,” a sly, smile-inducing strutter. And likewise, “Fishin’” feels as fun and refreshing as a secret honey hole on a hot day. Country to the core, its lyrics recall the innocence of young love – and the nostalgia of the genre’s most iconic hits. “I feel like it’s a great little summer song,” Lane says. “And for some reason, it lives in that same place that ‘Mayberry’ by Rascal Flatts does for me.”

Meanwhile, “Hero” reveals the man Lane has always been, and the artist he’s become. A slow, heartfelt ballad with an openly religious theme of personal conviction, Lane says he knew recording it could be risky, “but at the same time, there has never been a song that is more true to me.”

“I really prayed that I would get the song,” he explains. “And I don’t know if it will ever be a single or anything like that, but it speaks to my heart.”

Still, Lane named the album Laps Around the Sun for a reason, and the title track reflects how he feels about his journey to the here and now. Supremely relaxed, soulful, and full of mature optimism, it describes a hand-in-hand adventure which could be about Lane and the girl of his dreams … or it could be about Lane and country fans. Either way, he promises to keep on moving forward, together.

“Don’t you know we’ll never be done / Taking laps around the sun,” goes the chorus.

“I’ve learned a lot,” Lane admits. “With my first record, I was trying to figure out exactly what kind of sound I wanted to have, and now I know. I know what I truly love and what kind of artist I want to be. My goal was to make sure anyone who hears this album finds a song they can relate to. I hope I accomplished that.”

Devin Dawson

Devin Dawson
Warner Music Nashville / Atlantic Records artist Devin Dawson is not your typical country artist. His look is dark and bold. His sound is sleek and raw. He has a knack for writing razor sharp stories that cut straight to the heart, full of detail and clever turns of phrase. And his songs speak the language of a new generation. Dawson is an edgy study in contrast, poised as the next bolt of lightning to hit country’s family tree.

His approach to music is not different on purpose, it’s different with purpose. Twenty-eight years old and from Orangevale, California, Dawson grew up just outside the gates of Folsom Prison. He heard the sirens at night, and sang along to Johnny Cash, Alan Jackson, Marvin Gaye and Creedence Clearwater Revival. Arriving in Nashville in 2012, he put his unique skills to use authoring songs for other artists. When it came time to put together his own debut album, he teamed with equally daring producer Jay Joyce (Eric Church, Little Big Town, Brothers Osborne). Having co-written every track, the result is a mix of organic roots and high-voltage country, full of romance and delivered with a distinctive saw-toothed vocal. As he gets ready to join Maren Morris’ Hero Tour this year, Dawson is already establishing a reputation in Nashville as one of the most exciting modern singer-songwriters the format has ever seen.

Frankie Ballard

Frankie Ballard
Country- blues-rocker Frankie Ballard released his latest album El Rio (Warner Nashville) to critical acclaim and was selected by Rolling Stone as one of the 25 Best Country and Americana albums of 2016 and The Tennessean as one of the best 16 Nashville albums of 2016. The singer songwriter has had three #1 country hits to date and boasts Spotify streams in excess of 2.2 million. With a combined album sales of over 450,000 to date with over 150 million total streams across all streaming platforms, Ballard continues to lead the lead country music mixing an American heartland rock sound with traditional country and blues.

Frankie Ballard’s previous album, Sunshine & Whiskey, produced three consecutive no. 1 singles – the platinum-certified “Sunshine & Whiskey,” the gold-certified “Helluva Life,” and one of the Top 3 Billboard Country Airplay songs of 2015, “Young & Crazy.” He has performed on national television including Today, Live with Kelly and Jimmy Kimmel Live. Ballard has performed and toured with Luke Bryan, Keith Urban, Bob Seger, Kenny Chesney, Lady Antebellum, Big and Rich as well as at festivals such as Summerfest, Tortuga Music Festival, CMA Fest and many more.

El Rio was recorded at the famed Sonic Ranch, just south of El Paso in Tornillo, Texas, Ballard, band, and producer Marshall Altman left the comfort of Nashville in exchange for the opportunity to immerse themselves 24/7 creating this unique and fresh album. Rolling Stone describes the album as, “a different kind of album for the Michigan-born, Nashville-based songwriter, filled with country-rock anthems that have more in common with the heartland heroes of Ballard's youth — especially Bob Seger and John Mellencamp — than the outlaws and highwaymen whose names are so often cited by country music's younger class.” Ballard explains in the same article, "It's just my own brand of American music. There's rock & roll. There's country stories and country lyrics and country songs. And there's a lot of blues swagger and blues guitar playing. It's all those things together."

Mitchell Tenpenny

Mitchell Tenpenny
“I wanted to tell a bunch of different stories on this album, but they all had to be authentic and believable to me,” says Mitchell Tenpenny. “What I was feeling at the time, where I was in my head, what’s going on in the world, it all contributed to the end product. The songs that made it were the ones I was sure that I was passionate about getting on there—what I was proud of, what I really wanted to say.”

On the heels of his Platinum-certified No. 1 single, “Drunk Me,” comes Tenpenny’s major label debut album, Telling All My Secrets. Revealing a wide range of influences and a level of assurance and confidence that comes from already having years of songwriting and touring behind him, the record marks the arrival of an artist recently singled out recently singled out as one of Pandora’s Artists to Watch in 2019, MusicRow’s Next Big Thing honorees, and The Tennessean’s Next Nashville Stars for 2019.

Of course, these predictions aren’t all that bold, since “Drunk Me” has earned more than 170 million on-demand streams and surpassed 1 million certifiable units in the U.S. The singer claims that he knew the song was special as soon as he recorded it.

“Everything about it—the production, the hook, the performance—it felt like how I wanted to present myself,” he says. “We dug into that song and made it real cinematic and unusual. On the first playback, it felt like something Whitney Houston might do, and I thought, ‘This is what we need to be doing, this feels right,’ and it became the foundation of the record.”

Not that you can ever anticipate the kind of explosive success that “Drunk Me” has had. “You never know what’s going to happen,” says Tenpenny, “but I was confident enough to be OK with it if it failed. I knew I gave it my best, gave it my all. That’s something I learned playing football—my coach used to say that you can’t be afraid to lose. So with this song, I could go in fearless.”

That sense of clarity is largely a result of the relationship that the Nashville native had with his grandmother, industry veteran and the first female CEO of Sony/ATV Music Publishing, Donna Hilley. “I was very lucky,” says Tenpenny. “I got to grow up in this business, see it—I saw how my grandmother treated writers, and how important it was to the town. It’s a small circle of friends in this industry, and she always treated people right.” (This attitude also presumably helped Tenpenny in the album’s collaborations with such stellar songwriters as Hillary Lindsey, Devin Dawson and Josh Hoge.)

Tenpenny first picked up a guitar at the age of 13, and after graduating with a music business degree from Middle Tennessee State University, he began his professional career. The 2015 Black Crow album featured cameos from the SteelDrivers, Ace Frehley and Brian “Head” Welch from Korn. In 2017, his Linden Ave. EP made it to No. 6 on the Billboard “Heatseekers” chart.

Concurrently, he was seeing success as a songwriter, most notably co-writing Granger Smith’s Top 10 hit “If the Boot Fits.” Along the way, he has toured with the likes of Maren Morris, Jake Owen, Brett Young, Cole Swindell, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Dustin Lynch.

Though most of the album was written since the completion of the Mitchell Tenpenny EP, a few of the song go further back. “I wrote ‘Goner’ a long time ago,” he says. “That’s one of my favorites ever. I gave it my best John Mayer/ Michael Jackson impression—not that I ever thought, ‘I want to sound like that,’ but I can hear my own experiences in there, a combination of the music I’ve grown up with.”

Tenpenny embraces the idea that he’s part of a new generation of country artists who grew up listening to a diverse range of styles. “I never gave much thought about which genre I am,” he says. “You can hear rock, pop, gospel, but the lyrics always stay to what I am, to Nashville. It would be inauthentic for me to try to be Hank or Waylon or Willie—I want to transform and keep creating, I want to hear new, exciting things. We have to be able to change sounds or we’re going nowhere.”

The album’s final song, “Walk Like Him,” is the most personal track for Tenpenny. “It’s the first song I wrote about my dad after his passing, and it took a few years,” he says. “My family all say that I really do walk like him. I remember I was driving back from a show in the van, the band was all asleep in the back, and it just hit me and I broke down—I wrote that hook that night. I’ve been wanting to get it off my chest for years, and I wanted the album to end on that emotion. I think anyone who has lost someone can understand the feeling.”

The momentum for Tenpenny continues as he has recently released his new single “Alcohol You Later” to country radio. He’s headlining his 12-date “Telling All My Secrets Album Release Tour” through February, and has already been tapped as an opener for Old Dominion’s “Make It Sweet Tour” in 2019.

The official line has been that Mitchell Tenpenny wrote 56 songs for the album that became Telling All My Secrets, his Riser House/Columbia Nashville debut, but he admits that it was really several hundred, and that he can feel the growth in his work as he gains more experience. “My writing is getting more mature, more honest,” he says. “When you’re younger, you’re afraid to sing a lot of things, but as you get older, that wall starts to fall down. I’m talking about things that people my age are dealing with on a daily basis, and the best thing is have that vulnerability.

“I’ve seen more, traveled more, and you see the world and learn what people want. As you get older, you get a little wiser—I’m not saying that I’m wise, but I’m learning every day, and that comes out in the songs.”

Adam Doleac

Adam Doleac
Adam Doleac learned the value of building something with his own two hands, from the ground up, before he ever strummed his first chord or wrote his first lyric. His father introduced him to carpentry at age six, and the experience taught Adam it takes discipline to achieve your goals. The work ethic his father instilled in him led Adam to earn high school academic honors and excel at multiple sports. His baseball talent led him to be recruited by the University of Southern Mississippi. While at Southern Miss, Adam won three rings in four years and played in the 2009 College World Series.

A man of many talents, Adam was also a skilled drummer, though music wasn’t ever his top priority. Fate intervened during college, when shin stress fractures rendered him unable to pursue a post-college baseball career. By that time, Adam had taught himself guitar and developed his vocal ability.

When his baseball career officially ended, Adam started booking shows as a solo artist and writing songs with a teammate. He was diligent about posting his work online, and it quickly garnered the attention of established songwriters in Nashville. After several successful co-writes,Adam made the move to Nashville, and his career quickly gained traction. In 2014, SiriusXM’s The Highway selected “I Put It On Ya” as an On The Horizon track. Shortly thereafter, he was offered a publishing deal with Sony/ATV. To date, Adam’s ability to construct meaningful tunes have earned him cuts from Darius Rucker and Kane Brown.

Determined to also position himself as an artist, Doleac released a self-titled debut EP in June 2017. Sirius XM continues to be one of Adam’s most significant supporters. They have played multiple tracks from his EP on The Highway, and Adam was a featured artist on the fall 2017 Highway Finds Tour. Adam has also caught the attention of the streaming world, and several of his songs have earned spots on Spotify-curated country playlists.

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